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Homework For Year 2 Australia Firing

EDMONTON — An Alberta appeal board says the Edmonton Public School Board was unfair in suspending and firing teacher who gave out zeros to his students.

Lynden Dorval was suspended in May 2012 and fired four months later for awarding zeros to students who did not hand in homework or take assigned tests.

Dorval appealed to the Board of Reference and it has ruled that Dorval was treated unfairly in his dismissal.

The appeal board has ordered that Dorval be paid his salary from the date of his dismissal and also that his pension be topped up.

It also says it found no evidence of deliberate misconduct on Dorval’s part.

Dorval says the ruling was a pleasant surprise.

“The Board of Reference was very harsh on what the principal had done and how the superintendent had handled it so I was surprised at that, and also the no-zero, I was expecting virtually no comment on the correctness of the no-zero policy, I assumed that it would be strictly about the legality of what the school board did,” Dorval said.

The school board has 30 days to file the appeal.

In April 2013, the school board reversed its “no-zero” policy policy which barred teachers from giving students a grade of zero.

At a glance

  • Reading and problem solving are good activities for your child to do at home.
  • Play is an important part of your child's learning.
  • Any homework should reinforce what your child learns in class.
  • Schools develop homework policies with the help of teachers and parents.
  • If your child is having difficulties with any homework activities speak to their teacher.

Public schools in NSW don't expect children in Kindergarten to complete formal homework. They encourage families to read with their children and be involved in family activities that assist the development of their skills in reading, mathematics and problem solving to make the most of what they are learning.

Learning through play

Thea Eyles, an early childhood expert with the NSW Department of Education and Communities, says young children in the early years of school need the time to play.

Homework should help build good learning habits; it shouldn't exhaust or turn kids off. Ken OlahNSW Department of Education and Communities

"I think the most powerful message around the homework issue for parents of children who are in Kindergarten and Year 1 is that playing is learning," Thea says.

"Early childhood educators know the importance of learning through play – it is this philosophy that forms the basis of early childhood education, and all of the international research supports this approach."

Formal homework

More formal homework usually starts in Years 1 and 2 where children may be asked to complete some maths, simple writing tasks, or an activity sheet. The purpose of this homework is to reinforce what has been learnt in class.

Homework helps:

  • to bridge the gap between learning at school and learning at home.
  • parents to see what their child can do and to be involved in their learning.
  • improve children's concentration and focus.
  • children to retain and understand what they've been taught in class.
  • prepare children for what they will be taught the next day.
  • provide children with the challenges and stimulus they need to engage in their classwork.

Perfect balance

NSW Department of Education curriculum expert Ken Olah says the homework policy, which schools use as a guide, is based on common sense.

"The amount of homework depends on the age of the student, the school context, the subject, the purpose for which the homework is set, and so on," he says.

"Homework should help build good learning habits; it shouldn't exhaust or turn kids off."

Schools develop their own homework policy with input from staff and parents. Ask your school for a copy.

If you find homework is becoming too much or is too difficult for your child, or there is something specific going on for your family that makes getting homework done a real challenge, have a chat with your child's teacher.