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Mrs Jones Thank You Maam Essay

Teaching Roger life lessons is Mrs. Jones's motivation.

Mrs. Jones is motivated by wanting to provide instruction to Roger.  When Roger's attempt to rob her fails because he falls flat on his back with his legs in the air, Mrs. Jones prevents any effort at escape by delivering a swift kick "right square in his blue-jeaned sitter." Not mentioning police, she drags him bodily home with her

  After that the woman said, “Pick up...

Teaching Roger life lessons is Mrs. Jones's motivation.

Mrs. Jones is motivated by wanting to provide instruction to Roger.  When Roger's attempt to rob her fails because he falls flat on his back with his legs in the air, Mrs. Jones prevents any effort at escape by delivering a swift kick "right square in his blue-jeaned sitter." Not mentioning police, she drags him bodily home with her

  After that the woman said, “Pick up my pocketbook, boy, and give it here.” She still held him. But she bent down enough to permit him to stoop and pick up her purse. Then she said, “Now ain’t you ashamed of yourself?”
  Firmly gripped by his shirt front, the boy said, “Yes’m.”
  The woman said, “What did you want to do it for?”
  The boy said, “I didn’t aim to.”
  She said, “You a lie!”
  By that time two or three people passed, stopped, turned to look, and some stood watching.
  “If I turn you loose, will you run?” asked the woman.
  “Yes’m,” said the boy.

When Mrs. Jones takes Roger to her home, she provides instruction on a variety of levels.  She instructs him on the importance of personal hygiene: She makes him wash his face.  Mrs. Jones teaches Roger the lesson that others have suffered from want because of limits on money, and that not everyone wins out over temptation: 

The woman was sitting on the day-bed. After a while she said, "I were young once and I wanted things I could not get." ... The woman said, “Um-hum! You thought I was going to say but, didn’t you? You thought I was going to say, but I didn’t snatch people’s pocketbooks. Well, I wasn’t going to say that.” Pause. Silence. “I have done things, too, which I would not tell you, son—neither tell God, if he didn’t already know." 

Mrs. Jones is motivated by compassion because his actions are not unfamiliar to her: She has at one in her life behaved the way Roger has behaved.  Finally, Mrs. Jones is motivated by wanting Roger to learn before it is too late the ultimate lesson of the need to live a better life.  

When Mrs. Jones leaves Roger in the hallway with the stern warning of "Behave yourself, boy!" it is clear that Roger has learned the lessons Mrs. Jones was motivated to provide, lessons founded in understanding and compassion and mercy. 

  The boy wanted to say something else other than “Thank you, m’am” to Mrs. Luella Bates Washington Jones, but he couldn’t do so as he turned at the barren stoop and looked back at the large woman in the door. He barely managed to say “Thank you” before she shut the door.

In the short story "Thank You, Ma'am" by Langston Hughes, Mrs. Jones, the main character, demonstrates that she is a tough, yet sincere and honest woman. One of my favorite descriptions of her comes from the very first sentence. Hughes writes, "She was a large woman with a large purse that had everything in it but hammer and nails." 

Immediately after Roger attempted to steal that large purse, Mrs. Jones asked, "Now aren't you ashamed...

In the short story "Thank You, Ma'am" by Langston Hughes, Mrs. Jones, the main character, demonstrates that she is a tough, yet sincere and honest woman. One of my favorite descriptions of her comes from the very first sentence. Hughes writes, "She was a large woman with a large purse that had everything in it but hammer and nails." 

Immediately after Roger attempted to steal that large purse, Mrs. Jones asked, "Now aren't you ashamed of yourself?" Following her line of questioning, it was clear that Roger just wanted to be let off the hook, but she insisted on teaching him a lesson. This shows that she is tough (but) because she wanted to ensure that Roger would learn from his mistakes and never steal again. 

Just before dragging Roger to her house, Mrs. Jones said, “You ought to be my son. I would teach you right from wrong." When they arrived at her home, she made him clean himself up a bit and even made him some dinner. This shows her as sincere because she almost becomes a motherly figure to Roger; this is especially important, because we learn that he doesn't have any family. By being a role model, Mrs. Jones is one step closer to achieving her goal of ensuring that Roger doesn't make a mistake again. 

Towards the end of the story, Mrs. Jones admits to Roger, "I have done things, too, which I would not tell you, son—neither tell God, if he didn’t already know.” Through this revelation, Mrs. Jones continues to be a role model to Roger by showing him that he doesn't have to continue living the way he does. This makes her an honest person because she didn't have to admit to her past mistakes to him, but by doing so, she was able to connect to him on another level. 

While we know Roger never sees Mrs. Jones again, I think it's safe to bet that she had an influence on the rest of his life due to her tough, compassionate mannerisms.